Tag Archives: Fiction

Book review of ‘A Walk in the Rain’ by ‘Udai Yadla’


A walk in the rain by Udai Yadla

BLURB

Love is a poison that kills you. Love is an elixir that keeps you alive.

A story of an introvert, caught in a brawl,  who finds himself in the company of a well mannered, intelligent, courageous, full-of-self-pride yet a money monger prostitute on a long trip of vengeance. The trip will constantly take introvert Sunny to his beautiful past while taking prostitute Saloni to her ill-fated troubled past. Destiny brings them together for a purpose. A walk in the rain is an intricate tale of intense emotions that come out during the trip – full of action and thrill, twists and mysteries, love and redemption.

REVIEW

Attractive cover. Decent blurb. Good reviews on Amazon & Goodreads.

First Look : Passed

Prologue didn’t fit in much.

Climax and End gives this book an edge.

Interesting plot, good imagination. But a great work ruined by poor work of editing, proof reading.

OVERALL RATINGS : 3.5 / 5

A walk in the rain
Book review of ‘A walk in the rain’

D = Detailing to work.  Score : 3/5

The lead characters – Sunny and Saloni – are described in great detail. The book revolves around their past and covers minute details. The locations covered were not relatable and hence required better description.  However, the core of the book – Sunny’s relusive nature and Saloni’s troubled past are beautifully interwoven with emotions that gradually change over time.

R = Realistic weaving of the fiction.  Score : 4/5

The story was not set in relatable locations which weakened reader connect. Having said that, emotions were nicely weaved to add flavour of reality. The chats of a prostitute and young lad, humane side of people involved in prostitution, etc. potrayed dark side of our society.

O = Organized.  Score : 3.5/5

Poorly organized. The story has a timeline which goes unnoticed because of poor editing and structure. One can follow the sequence of events taking place in the story most of the times, but may lose track when Sunny suddenly drifts into past.

P = Plot and Characters. Score : 4.5/5

Plot kept me engaged inspite of no. of issues in the narration and editing. Strong character buildup of Sunny, Sandy and Saloni, simultaneous involvment of supporting characters -Pooja, Sam and Imran helped the plot in many ways.The plot had moments of crime and brawls, smart ideas, action sequences, strong climax and stronger end, aniticipated twist towards the end, etc. It’s a perfect bollywood match drapped in artistry.

S = Story Telling. Score = 3/5

OK narration with poor dialogue delivery and description. Monologues of Sunny did good enough to help a reader understand a reclusive’s mind. It is always difficult to potray an introvert in narration. Any book on love, romance or troubled past is expected to have good one liners that remain etched in the minds of readers for long. However, that did not happen with this book. One strong positive in story telling was the frequent transition from present to past and nostalgia involving some beautiful memories from childhood.

Overall,  better narration, lesser grammatical and spelling errors, and better dialogues could have made this book Udai Yadla’s masterpiece. What Udai Yadla missed was a good editor.

It’s a one time read for new readers.

Thank you Writersmelon for sending me this book.

 

 

 

 

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Comparing Books One Indian Girl, The Four Patriots


In October first week, Rupa Publications launched two fiction books- Chetan Bhagat’s ‘One Indian Girl’ and Sumit Agarwal’s ‘The Four Patriots’. Interestingly, both these books are hitting the right notes at the right time; clearly winning the sentiments of Indian readers. No doubt Rupa is called ‘The House of Bestsellers’!

One Indian Girl by Chetan BhagatThe Four Patriots by Sumit Agarwal

One Indian Girl & The Four Patriots : Points of Parity and Difference 

1.Contemporary Fiction

Both the books are contemporary fiction. While ‘One Indian Girl’ is like the other fiction works of Chetan Bhagat involving romance and youth, ‘The Four Patriots’ has elements of patriotism, politics and thriller.

2. Based on issues in Indian Society

Both the books address issues prevalent in the Indian society.

One Indian Girl is clearly based on women empowerment and feminism – topics on tip of tongue.  The recent movie ‘PINK’, supporting an altogether different theme of feminism, brought Indian women in picture and this worked for Chetan Bhagat. ‘One Indian Girl’ had record breaking pre-orders of 2 Lakh copies by 20th September, 11 days before official launch of the book!

The Four Patriots is based on four individuals dissatisfied with the system, who set on a journey to change things and bring back glory to the nation. Clearly based on patriotism, it has elements of Terrorism, poor performance in Olympics, Caste-based reservations, water issues between states, thereby clearly taking public sentiments hands on. The recent Uri attacks, surgical strikes and approach with Pakistan is icing on the cake for Sumit.

3. Chetan Bhagat & Sumit Agarwal

While Chetan Bhagat is a brand in himself, a youth icon; Sumit Agarwal is a first time writer.  Just like Chetan Bhagat, Sumit is also an IITian getting into writing. (Seems like IITians don’t want to be just engineers!) Chetan is an investment banker, a columnist, screenplay writer, speaker and motivator and has been judge in shows like Nach Baliye (weird!). Sumit Agarwal is a director of a chemical business, singer and runs NGOs in Kanpur. They belong to same age group.

4. Keep it simple silly!

Simple English – Chetan Bhagat’s signature. Sumit Agarwal’s book follows the same. Simple and Lucid. Easy and written for all.

5. Heroes & Villains 

Every story has heroes and villains. In ‘One Indian Girl’, there is a heroine – Radhika. ( Rahul Gandhi will be happy with Chetan Bhagat empowering a woman!) And the boyfriends, mother, aunts … the society are villains! Chetan Bhagat has portrayed mother of Radhika as orthodox, thinking always of what people will say.

‘The Four Patriots’ has four lead characters suffering at the hands of the system. Patriotism totally ingrained in these guys, they went on to fight elections and become ministers of the country. But when it’s politics, there will be all sorts of villains. Corrupt politicians, scamsters, anti-nationals, terrorists and naxals. Relatable to the real life political-national scenario.. isn’t it?

6. Sex and No Sex!

Chetan Bhagat is known for his marketing gimmicks. One Indian Girl got trending for Page No. 57. Guess what Chetan must have placed. Sex! Like he does it in all his books. Explicit sex. Even when it is not required to show to the extent. Neither it is some E.L.James work nor it is the core theme of the book. He knows well how to attract the Indian non-readers. Thankfully, he’s got no Pahlaj Nihlani for books!

Sumit Agarwal has garnished patriotism with romance and love. No sex. There are moments in ‘The Four Patriots’ but he maintains the sanctity of the book’s theme.

7. Marketing Gimmicks

Ask authors and they say, ‘Writing is easy, Marketing is tough!’ Authors these days try innovative ideas to promote their books.

Apart from Press releases, grand book launches, video teasers and contests, Chetan Bhagat went to Arnub with a U! The team at TVF and Bhagat went on to humiliating Chetan Bhagat and his works. Arnub literally spits on his book! Chetan shows his waxed leg to promote his research on feminism for ‘One Indian Girl’. And if that was low, he also agrees to show his stupid dancing clip on Nach Baliye stage. Lows of negative publicity! And not to forget how he promised sex in the teaser itself!

Negative promotion of One Indian Girl with TVF, Arnub

Negative promotion of One Indian Girl with TVF, Arnub

Sumit Agarwal went on to develop a 5 minute trailer of the book ‘The Four Patriots’, using actors to create a Bollywood style fast-paced drama. He composed theme song titled ‘Four Patriots hai hum’. He even created 14 episode series of ‘Kya aap Deshbhakt kehlane e layak hai?’ 10 sec ads to promote the theme of his book.

Image result for Sumit Agarwal14 episode series of ‘Kya aap Deshbhakt hai?’ for The Four Patriots

8. Soon to be a major motion picture

Both the books are written such that they can be converted to Bollywood movies. Chetan Bhagat has a series of books converted to motion pictures. No surprise if One Indian Girl finds its way to a big Bollywood banner.

Image result for chetan bhagat one indian girl

Sumit Agarwal stated on the launch of ‘The Four Patriots’ that few Bollywood houses are looking forward to convert it to a movie script.  Interestingly, there were two directors present at the launch – Vivek Agnihotri and Jaideep Sen. In fact, Jaideep Sen gave his nod to the fact that he is looking forward to convert it to a movie script. Although Sumit Agarwal hasn’t decided yet.

 Image result for sumit agarwal book launch

However, Sumit Agarwal has a long way to go. Chetan Bhagat is the most loved and hated Indian author simultaneously. It has taken books, controversies and what not to become what he is today. A good book is just not enough!

The Missed Call ( The Backbenchers, #2 )


The Missed Call by Sidharth Oberoi
The BackBenchers

Author : Siddharth Oberoi

Genre   : Fiction, Urban life

Ratings: 2 of 5 stars false

Story in Author’s words:

Natasha, the heartthrob of The Presidency Convent, lost her stardom, her pride and her boyfriend overnight, with no idea what hit her. But she does have her suspicions, namely — Ananya.

She is not going to take her downfall lying down. And now that she has her hands upon something that can ruin Ananya’s life, she can’t wait to have her revenge.

Meanwhile, Shreya stays at a distance, and sees Natasha destroy herself in hatred, revenge and pain. It aches her to see her once-upon-a-time best friend throw her life away like this. But what can she do about it?

The Backbenchers – The Missed Call traces the story of Natasha Malhotra as she struggles with depression, vengeance and the loss of social equity. Will she get her old life back? Or will she destroy herself?

my review:

Why I should read this book is a difficult question to answer; More difficult to answer will be the regular jibes that will prompt out on my desktop commenting: “if  ‘The Extra Class’ wasn’t enough, Smit wants to add an extra book to his ‘read’ shelf too quickly.” After reading mind boggling thrillers like ‘The Da Vinci Code’ or heart touching ‘a quiver full of arrows’, one needs to take a little bit of rest.But ‘rest from reading’ is something which I loathe more than myself.So in such course of time, I prefer to read books of such genres.In layman’s language, light reading is always necessary.Nobody can continue on with thrillers and heart chillers forever.A bit change of genre or switching  to Layman’s so called ‘light reading’ does seem to be an obvious choice.And why should it not be?

 

Siddharth Oberoi possesses a special charm when it comes to simplicity and lucidity.It is not always important to present the content in a rhetorical way.The simpler,the better.I would always recommend ‘The Backbenchers series’ as the best one to start with; infact, the best book for novices.Completing the sequel, my mind as a critic was continuously gathering up the content and was able to brief it far shorter than any book with 200+ pages would provide a gist of.Is it so that the genre of teenage faces  paucity of ideas ? There was hardly any change well distinguished from the previous one, except the concept of forgivenesswell woven by Oberoi.

If a rotten mango can spoil the lot, why can’t a juicy one transform the rotten ones to ripen? Well, if that’s not possible in mangoes, it does in Oberoi’s teenage fiction.It’s just an old convention to bring the villain to defeating edge at the end.

Rarely does it happen that villains transform to heroes, but Oberoi brings that change in this book.Other than the concept of forgiveness, there is nothing that can touch the readers. 

About The Author
Sidharth Oberoi is a pseudonym. The Backbenchers series is written by writers Sachin Garg and Durjoy Datta, from the Grapevine India community.